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Review

Lewitt LCT240 Pro

Issue #52

 

 

Competition at this price point is ferocious, which is good news for any of us looking to buy a mic or two. As always, we do need to make sure that we can get the sound that we want to hear, but I think the LCT 240 Pro sounds as good as anything I’ve heard in its class.
Andi Picker

Pros

  • Great sound
  • Good off axis response makes it flexible and easy to use
  • Well engineered
  • Excellent price

Cons

  • Realistically, none at the price 

Lewitt LCT240 Pro

Andi Picker is quickly becoming a considerable fan of Lewitt, with consistently high-quality mics coming through the Gi doors from them in the past year. This issue he takes a look at their entry-level model, the LCT 240 Pro.

 


There’s something about the look and feel of Lewitt’s LCT range of microphones that I find to be very pleasing – I think I like that they manage to look different yet familiar and that the designers have obviously considered how they feel when you handle them. Even more, I like how the LCT 640 TS and LCT 440 Pure models that I’ve reviewed in previous issues of GI magazine have sounded, and now it’s time to take a look at the entry-level LCT 240 Pro.

The LCT 240 aims to do a similar job to the 440 but at a significantly lower price. It shares the look and feel and the straight-ahead cardioid-only/no pad/no filter design of the more expensive mic, but has a different, smaller capsule.

 

In use, the LCT 240 does what it’s intended to do – it seems to work on just about everything with a slightly bright but smooth sound. Compared to the 440, it seems to have a bit less low end, a bit more bite in the uppers and then softer “air” frequencies. Sensitivity is lower, and noise is higher as a result of the smaller capsule, but still within easy to use limits (specs are roughly similar to some small diaphragm condensers). What we want to hear from a mic is always going to be subjective, and one person’s “warm” may be someone else’s “dull”, and “harsh” on one source might be “clear” on another. What makes a microphone flexible is often how it behaves off axis – can we turn it a few degrees for a warmer or brighter sound or does it go phasey or thin when we do that, and can we eq the sound without finding unpleasant resonances or discovering that we’re missing detail. Whilst the LCT 240 doesn’t, to my ears, have quite the same sense of openness of the larger capsule 440, it does respond very well to being positioned, and on some sources (like my acoustic guitar with well-past-their-best strings on it) the slightly brighter/less boomy sound was actually easier to use. If you do prefer the sound of the more expensive LCT 440 Pure, bear in mind that for the extra cost you also get the excellent Lewitt shock mount and magnetic pop-shield!

Competition at this price point is ferocious, which is good news for any of us looking to buy a mic or two. As always, we do need to make sure that we can get the sound that we want to hear, but I think the LCT 240 Pro sounds as good as anything I’ve heard in its class. It responds well to positioning and eq and looks and feels great...oh, and it’s available in white!

GI 52 Cover
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Issue #53

Black Country Communion

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